Learning to Learn
Sep21

Learning to Learn

Learning to Learn Pinterest board

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Learning Design
Sep21

Learning Design

Learning design model I designed the Double Loop Self-Regulated Learning cycle to assist myself and my teaching team develop a blended learning delivery for Learning to Learn units from the Foundatrion Studies Training Package.  Background Several factors converge to create the context for this e learning design model. The challenges to TAFE teaching sections by the  introduction of the Smart and Skilled Vocational Education and Training Strategy in NSW  in 2015; the increasing trend in providing flexible and personalised learning ;  the introduction of the Foundation Skills Training Package amidst the release of several damning reports into the level of foundation and employability skills of Australian workers. In Vocational Education and Training the focus has been on competency with courses built around units of competency making up industry specific training packages. However, while students may gain competency in a range of specific technical skills, it does not follow that they will also gain professional competency or a framework for learning how to learn, (Dryen, 2003). While the “shelf life of many technical skills is decreasing”, (Chappell, Hawke et al, 2004), learning to learn has become a very desirable attribute for employees to manage change and contribute to innovative work practices.  Who are the Stakeholders? 1.     Learners The learners in Northern Sydney Institute (NSI) Foundation Education Faculty are: ·        Developing prevocational language, literacy, numeracy, digital and learning skills ·        Accessing job readiness programs ·        Vocational students requiring language, literacy, numeracy, digital and learning skill development to successfully complete their qualification.  Many have limited exposure to technology. Some are fearful of technology. Some young people, ostensibly digital native, have very limited understanding and experience of the range of technological learning experiences in a training or work context. Technology is an integral part of learning and work in the 21st century. 21st century literacy includes the capacity to search, refine, discard, and creatively use information for a variety of purposes. In many vocational and work contexts, professional knowledge is subject to fast and continual change and learners require strategies to keep current and embrace change. Being able to source, assimilate, use, reinvent, repurpose, review and update skills and knowledge and work with others are crucial skills for current learners and current and future workers. Adaptable and well-designed blended learning programs can develop learning to learn skills which could be accessed ‘in the workplace, in a Campus Learning Centre, or anywhere an individual learner requires access to it.  2.     Teaching staff Most Northern Sydney Institute Foundation Education Faculty teaching staff are unfamiliar with teaching using a blended learning approach. With little experience of online learning in their own lives or professional development, they...

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Blended learning in foundation classes
Jul09

Blended learning in foundation classes

Blended learning- a mix of models of learning- is essential in prevocational foundation skills classrooms. Skilling our students in foundation skills while linking these skills to vocational contexts for further learning and development means we must provide learning experiences which will enable our students to interact effectively with team based, digital and face to face learning environments. At Meadowbank campus, Northern Sydney Institute, we have introduced blending vocational and foundation skills teaching methodologies to students at a Certificate II level. These students will go on to Certificate III vocational courses, which will require them to be  familiar with a variety of teaching/learning strategies. Our students require more flexible and individualised learning experiences. These can be gained in small group, work team based learning opportunities as where students develop communication skills in a real setting, solving a workplace problem, for example. We have run this blended approach with prevocational students interested in both Aged Care and Child Studies careers, with great effect this...

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The MOOC environment and foundation skills
Nov30

The MOOC environment and foundation skills

The question about the use of the MOOC environment to the teaching and learning of Foundation Skills is I believe simply one of equity and access. My central contention is that our students can’t afford for practitioners like us to be left out of the e eLearning loop. Three factors have converged to lead me to that conclusion. The recent definition of Foundation Skills combining foundation and employability skills; the rise of the Massively Open Online Course (or MOOC) itself and the unequalled opportunity Massively Multiplayer Role-Playing Online Games (MMORPGs) offer teachers and learners in the development of foundation skills. In the adult literacy and numeracy field, it could be considered controversial to contend that a MOOC environment could play a significant role in the development of Foundation Skills in Australian adult learners but I hope I can explore the issues with you and demonstrate that not exploring this path, further isolates already marginalized learners from current education discourse. The National Foundation Skills Strategy For Adults defines Foundation Skills as “English language, literacy and numeracy-listening, speaking, writing, digital literacy and the use of mathematical ideas and employability skills such as collaboration, problem solving, self management, learning and information and communication technology (ICT) skills required for participation in modern workplaces and contemporary life. “ The 2006 Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey showed 40% of Australian workers have low levels of document literacy. This has changed little in the ten years since the last survey. This means that the Language, Literacy and Numeracy demands of modern workplaces in terms of reading and following instructions, communicating reliably by email or interpreting graphs and charts, for example,  are beyond the skill level of 46% of Australian adults. 68% of working age Australians have problem solving skills below level 3. The key finding for educators -and you can see this in my first slide- is that the majority of Australian adults with literacy levels at 1 or 2 are already employed. The same is true for the numeracy and problem solving domains.  For these individuals it is clear that stronger foundation skills would enhance their ability to keep up with technological changes in the workplace, retrain in other areas or change careers. To come to my second main point, MOOCs. Massively Open Online Courses have been praised for achieving a democratizing and disruptive influence on traditional models of education in the higher education sphere. Sebastian Thrun, Salman Khan, Daphne Koller burst into the scene with irresistible vistas of free accessible and networked education delivered on a global level.  On my second slide you see what happened as disappointing course completion levels, and the...

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